Honors class joins the village

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is the third in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Heather Sangalang

Instead of our usual routine of visiting a specific location to experience the innovative creations that reside in the Moss Arts Center, we remained in the classroom to get educated about the serious matter of working with children. At first glance, the task of working with/around kids seems to be lighthearted and simple, but there turns out to be a lot of things that you must be aware of if. Our instructor went through a Powerpoint that contained important information about this subject.

The main goal of this “training” was to learn how to keep the children safe. They are entrusted in us and we should be made aware of how to protect them. When a child gets physically injured, we would either let another superior know or call for help ourselves; paperwork is also involved in this process. It may seem like a lot of extra steps when the easy solution would just be to help them ourselves, but for legal and safety purposes, others must get involved.

During the lecture, the class heard some disturbing and negative terms, such as pedophile. It is not a pleasant subject, but it had to be touched upon because, again, our number one goal is to keep the kids safe. We are not allowed to leave a child alone with an adult. I was uncomfortable learning about this at the beginning, but I had to realize that I had to know this if I was to work with kids because I would not want anything to happen to them under my watch, especially if it was preventable.

After getting through the Powerpoint of listed precautions and expectations, the members of the class split up to brainstorm possible emergencies that we could encounter and devise a solution for them. A few of the ideas that were shared included if a child had a seizure, if an earthquake hit, if a child got lost, and if the child had an asthma attack. We expressed our opinions on how to deal with those kinds of situations and our instructor chimed in with her advice as well.

After this class, the term, “It takes a village to raise a child”, made me realize even more that it does take a lot of people to raise kids. No matter whether we volunteer for K2C, the Science Museum, or any of the other activities that involves kids, we won’t be single-handedly responsible for the kids. We have each other, other parents, and other volunteers to assist us if there is an emergency. The most important things are to make the child happy and make sure they are protected and loved if something happens. I love working with kids, so this training excited me because I became more equipped for my K2C volunteering that starts next month. This class was beneficial for all of us because we will use this knowledge well-beyond this class.

I’m Heather and I love family, food, and football. You can usually catch me laughing, drinking coffee, or watching YouTube videos.

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