3D modeling for the Honors class

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is another in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Justin Gravatt:

In this week’s Honors service learning class, we took a trip to the Create Studio. In the Create Studio, we learned about different ways to create prototypes. Before class, we learned some of the terminology that is used in three-dimension prototyping. Each of us also designed our own object to prototype using a free computer-aided design program, TinkerCad. We then printed out each of our objects using one of the 3D printers that is in the space. Some of the things that the lab features include two 3D printers, a laser cutter, basic hand tools, soldering supplies, electronic testing equipment, and several other prototyping tools.

Although this was not my first experience working in three dimensions or using prototyping tools, I still learned some interesting new things. I first used this technology in high school. I now regularly use three-dimensional modeling and create prototypes as an architecture major. The TinkerCad software is very easy to use, but in that aspect, it doesn’t have many features that other more advanced computer-aided design programs have such as AutoCAD or Rhino do.

As technology advances, it also gains more applications for its use. Today, 3D printing is not just used to make prototypes but also used in making products as well as in the construction industry, the food industry, and even in the medical industry. The technology has advanced to a point that it is possible to 3D print organs. This use, once fully developed, will make it possible to save a lot more lives by being able to create organs for those who will otherwise die. In the construction industry, it is now possible to 3D print a house out of concrete in less than a day.

Overall, the Create Studio provides the equipment necessary to generate working prototypes from the thoughts in one’s head. This studio and the other spaces that we have explored in class really show that ICAT has the necessary tools to foster creativity and innovation.

Justin Gravatt is a first-year Architecture student at Virginia Tech. His interests include real estate, intelligent infrastructure, and sustainability.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *