ICAT Honors class gets visit from Science Museum of Western Virginia

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is the last in a series of guest blogs from my students. Enjoy! ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Willow Pedersen:

This week, Hannah from the Science Museum of Western Virginia visited our class. With her, she brought water cups, plastic Easter eggs, water balloons, rubber bands, paper clips, and more. Our challenge was to make an object with neutral buoyancy, meaning that it floated in the water, but didn’t sink down or float up to the surface. Almost everyone started with the Easter eggs. My partner, Adham, and I did this. We glued over the holes so that more water wouldn’t come in. Adham explained to me that there was an air pocket in the egg, which I hadn’t realized, so we needed to weigh it down. We cut paper clips to try to weigh it just enough but ended with a final strip of rubber band (the metal was just a little bit too heavy). We watched our classmates experiment with bottle caps, corks, and masking tape.

Once Hannah saw that Adham and I were finished, she gave us another task: create a neutral buoyant object without using an egg. We started this task with a bottle cap and foam, weighed down with buttons. When we realized it wasn’t heavy enough, we reused our paper clip clippings from the Easter egg, which was slightly more effective. While we didn’t get the second object neutrally buoyant, we were one of t  he only groups to successfully complete the first task.

Hannah has all age groups do this activity. It is called problem-based learning, learning from the process of solving a problem. Hannah explained that younger groups tend to find solutions more quickly because they are less intimidated and discouraged by failure. Problem-based learning is informal—we don’t actively seek to learn from the process, but we do. From this, I learned that Easter eggs have air pockets in them, a hot glue stick can be pushed down to get more but the stick will turn into glue before you can get it all out, and foam gets waterlogged and eventually sinks. I went into this to solve a problem, but I ended up learning.

In the context of museums, Hannah said, much of learning happens from experimentation. The Science Museum of Western Virginia has a Scratch area that allows children to program a caterpillar to move from one point to another. It teaches children the fundamentals of programming as they use the program.

What surprised me most about today’s class was how different museums can be. Though I hadn’t thought about it, I realize that a science museum is totally different from an art museum, and it has to be. While children or adults can interact with exhibits to learn about science, that’s just not possible with art. One of my favorite museum moments, in which classroom learning translated to an emotional understanding, was when I visited the Holocaust museum in Washington, DC. There was a room with the shoes of the victims. There were so many pairs, and the pairs represented more people. It was overwhelming and put so much into perspective.

In reference to SEAD, Science, Engineering, Art, and Design, I would say that from the scientist’s perspective, museums use all four. Art and Design are used to come up with exhibits, science and engineering to build them. From a visitor’s perspective, I am concerned only with Art and Design because that is what I see and what I interact with. In the future, museums will be even more interactive. I think as we rely more and more on the internet for our learning, museums will be a supplement. They have physical representations of what we learn about formally. I think paintings may become 3D. At least when 3D Holograms become more popular, there will definitely be interactive holograms in museums. I think there will be museums devoted solely to technology, like the evolution of computers, and tours may not even be given except for guided audio tours. However, I think museums will still use problem based learning to encourage experimentation, and therefore, successful informal learning. Though museums are not necessarily on the forefront of people’s minds, museums fill a niche unlike any other, and a world without them just wouldn’t be as full.

Willow Pedersen: Business. Music. Poetry. Data. Leader/learner. Incredibly lucky to love my life. Inspired to help others love theirs.

Honors class explores evaluation of informal learning

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is another in a series of guest blogs from my students. Stay tuned for more. Enjoy! ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Eliza Hong:

Our class on Monday centered on the importance of evaluation of projects and specifically in application to ICAT day. Dr. Julee Farley came to share her knowledge on evaluation with us and also led us through an activity where we came up with novel and cheap ways of evaluating something like ICAT day.

Summative evaluation is evaluating a project’s outcome, whereas formative evaluation centers on the process while the project is happening. Dr. Farley explained why these types of evaluation are important, and also the difference between evaluation and research.

Before giving us any information, Dr. Farley had us group in three groups to come up with novel ways to evaluate ICAT Day, leaving even what we evaluating up to the groups. By not giving us prior information, the idea was that we would come up with more broad ranging ideas. For this project, we were given several guidelines: the solution had to be novel (which mostly meant no surveys), cheap, not bothersome, and not collect any personal information. Our groups centered on evaluating how many people visited the exhibits, and which ones were visited most often. The first group talked about a bingo game that would be filled out with stickers from each exhibit. Prizes would be given out to those who won the game or filled out the entire sheet. Having different stickers each hour would also indicate how long a given person had stayed. The second group came up with the idea of an app that would explain exhibits to people (Pokémon Go –style?) and possibly track them. My group had very (er-) interesting ideas, from voodoo dolls to food to destruction. We settled on a passport idea that participants could decorate with items from each exhibit, similar to the idea of the first group, of tracking which exhibits were visited more often.

We then talked about the ways that ICAT Day was being evaluated and had been evaluated before. Phyllis told our class that something similar to the sticker-at-the-exhibits idea but with stations at several corners instead of all the exhibits. We were then given an overview of the survey-heavy methods for evaluating ICAT Day, although a new position was just created to be a “Creative Evaluator.” For now, we were told, this position would consist of counting things, inspired by a commercial of the man who broke the record running the Appalachian trail (how many hamburgers he ate, Red bulls he drank, etc.) We finished off the class by assigning everyone to different shifts for volunteering on ICAT day. All in all, evaluation was presented in a new light to me, as something that was meaningful and could improve projects, and we get to have a part in it for ICAT Day.

Eliza Hong is a student bombarded with fresh ideas out of ICAT (Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology) at Virginia Tech, wanting to make the world a better place while finding her own mission. Eliza is hoping to transfer into industrial design; she is interested in interdisciplinary creativity.

Honors class: Communicating Science with Improv

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is another in a series of guest blogs from my students. Stay tuned for more. Enjoy! ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Chad Biever:

Well, score a victory for the non-traditional classroom experience. This week’s class took us beyond the traditional classroom lecture and beyond even the less-traditional lab tours. Instead, we played a series of improvisational theater-inspired games to help us learn to communicate science to the public. We then discussed the importance of being able to communicate science and the challenges we may face in trying to do so, and how these ideas may be applicable in the future.

List out the activities we did, you would be hard-pressed to show how they teach us to discuss science. We opened with a name-learning game that connected every person’s name to an action related to an activity they liked to do. This seemed more successful than the many name-learning exercises I’ve been subjected to over the years. We then moved into a game that had us standing in a circle and looking to make eye contact with another person in the circle. If that person you see said “yes”, you would move to take their place. Move too early, and you were out. While the word “yes” lost all meaning after a while (and left me wanting to listen to 90125), it did show some principles of conscientiousness while working with others. Another game that had us having to call out an assigned number as it constantly shifted sought to teach similar ideas.

Perhaps the most interesting game happened in the middle of the class. We were first asked to make a circle. Then we had to make a letter A. Then a letter P. We had our right to speak taken away. Then a letter S. We lost our right to gesticulate. Then a letter Q. Then a circle again. Everything was going smoothly. Then a T. Then an M. Then an elephant. That threw a wrench into our plans. Without any way of communicating besides body position and facial expressions we had difficulty coming to an agreement about whether we were making a 2D or 3D elephant, an elephant face or a full elephant, or a what any of this stuff looked like anyway. This was interesting, since our ability to make letters was improved by not being able to talk. When the goal was clear, the nonverbal cues and subtle elements who took on leading and following roles proved more beneficial to communication. When there was more intensive thinking involved, verbal communication became necessary. This called attention to the importance of nonverbal cues in communication, a fact that often gets lost in my particular world of engineering memos and diagrams.

I’m in the College of Engineering, and engineering as a subject area lives downstream from science. Transferring knowledge from science to engineering is usually done through the trusted mediators in the Engineering Science & Mechanics field, the most feared of all engineering disciplines at Tech. But surely the profession would be well served by greater understanding of science. It increases the number of things that engineers can consider in their design processes, and thus design against a greater number of failure cases. Engineers would also be well served to see examples of how design and maintenance is handled in areas outside their own; you can look at the biology-inspired machines of Boston Dynamics to see examples of the creativity that can be unlocked when this occurs.

Engineers can also use theatrical techniques to explain their own field. Engineering is a tricky discipline to explain to the general public, since much of the field is, frankly, a bit dull. Even explanations of cool stuff like robots tend to either devolve into technical jargon or stay at a surface-level discussion. Since engineering affects just about everything in the world these days, it seems unwise to keep the public out of the loop. Finding out-of-the-box ways to interest the public will require thinking clearly about what would interest people outside of the engineering bubble by analyzing what they would emotionally connect to. Then we could develop engaging ways to hold public interest.

Communication is fundamental to accomplishing anything in STEM fields, yet it is heavily deemphasized in favor of technical knowledge. To be sure, many engineering majors would rather solve heat transfer problems than hold a conversation with a stranger anyway. But through entertaining games and exercises, perhaps we can make some headway and show STEM professionals what a delight it can be to share your knowledge with somebody else and have them understand completely.

Chad Biever is a mechanical engineering student trying to escape the typical engineering design team experience and find new ways to solve problems. He has particular interests in robotics, 3D printing, and part design work.

3D modeling for the Honors class

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is another in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Justin Gravatt:

In this week’s Honors service learning class, we took a trip to the Create Studio. In the Create Studio, we learned about different ways to create prototypes. Before class, we learned some of the terminology that is used in three-dimension prototyping. Each of us also designed our own object to prototype using a free computer-aided design program, TinkerCad. We then printed out each of our objects using one of the 3D printers that is in the space. Some of the things that the lab features include two 3D printers, a laser cutter, basic hand tools, soldering supplies, electronic testing equipment, and several other prototyping tools.

Although this was not my first experience working in three dimensions or using prototyping tools, I still learned some interesting new things. I first used this technology in high school. I now regularly use three-dimensional modeling and create prototypes as an architecture major. The TinkerCad software is very easy to use, but in that aspect, it doesn’t have many features that other more advanced computer-aided design programs have such as AutoCAD or Rhino do.

As technology advances, it also gains more applications for its use. Today, 3D printing is not just used to make prototypes but also used in making products as well as in the construction industry, the food industry, and even in the medical industry. The technology has advanced to a point that it is possible to 3D print organs. This use, once fully developed, will make it possible to save a lot more lives by being able to create organs for those who will otherwise die. In the construction industry, it is now possible to 3D print a house out of concrete in less than a day.

Overall, the Create Studio provides the equipment necessary to generate working prototypes from the thoughts in one’s head. This studio and the other spaces that we have explored in class really show that ICAT has the necessary tools to foster creativity and innovation.

Justin Gravatt is a first-year Architecture student at Virginia Tech. His interests include real estate, intelligent infrastructure, and sustainability.

Exploring making and tinkering with Honors students

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is another in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

This week we visited the 3D print lab, the Fusion Studio, and a couple of other of the amazing new spaces at Newman Library.  Students were asked, “What are your experiences with making and tinkering? What was new to you about what you saw at Newman Library? What conditions and mindsets do you think are necessary for making and tinkering?”  Two students’ contrasting responses make up this entry.

From guest blogger Emily Barritt:

Making and tinkering are simply names for actions that people have been doing for years. The idea of creating something from nothing is what is behind making, and the idea of iterations, not 100% knowing what the end design is an allowing the creative process flow through multiple developments is the true essence of tinkering. One cannot work on a making and tinkering project with a closed mind about the end goal. Instead, one needs to approach the project with open arms and be willing to let what comes of working and reworking the given problem guide the final product. As disappointing as it is for me to realize, I am not a good maker or tinkerer. As somewhat of a perfectionist, I have a hard time failing and learning as I work through the problem. This is something that I have been trying to work on and I am actively looking for outlets to “practice” my maker and tinkering skills. I am strongly considering working on a simple design project for the 3D printer as a way to explore my maker side.

I am almost embarrassed to admit that I did not know that any of the resources that we saw today were available at the library. This class was definitely an eye opener for me. I am excited to see what new things are created from the spaces that are being developed for students. The library is most definitely doing their part in helping VT students invent the future.

Emily Barritt is a scientist who plays music, and a musician who studies science on a quest to integrate her fields to work towards developing something bigger than herself. She is eager to explore the new technologies of the day and integrate creativity, arts, and technology to develop new innovations.

From guest blogger Pamela Kryschtal:

What are your experiences with making and tinkering? 

This past week was my favorite class so far.  I felt a real connection not just to my major, engineering, but to my engineering law minor as well.  I would heavily consider myself a maker and a tinker, I like to come up with things I can use by recycling old objects.

I made the following headboard out of 2x4s, 4-inch foam, and fabric:

I made the following duvet cover out of purchased fabric and an old top sheet:

And I also made the following DVD shelf for my boyfriend out of an old pallet:

What was new to you about what you saw at Newman Library?  

Having not entered Virginia Tech as a Freshman, I’ve always found the library rather intimidating.  I barely know how to print anything or even check out a book, let alone 3D print something.  So essentially, it’s easy to say that everything was new to me about what we saw in Newman Library.  I talk about this class a lot with my friends and I can’t wait to show them the spaces I’ve discovered and reserve time to play with 3D technology.

What conditions and mindsets do you think are necessary for making and tinkering?

As I mentioned above, this week’s class connected to my minor of engineering law.  I think the first condition that is necessary for making and tinkering is the feeling of safety that the maker’s intellectual property is protected.  If people don’t feel like they will be able to maintain control over their own ideas, they will be less likely to take chances and attempt to make.

The mindset that is necessary for making and tinkering is that of creativity and fearlessness.  The creativity approach is obvious, as the word “create” is the root of the word.  The fearlessness is important when taking chances and being open to the idea that it might not work and that’s ok, because it also might work and be amazing.

Pamela Kryschtal is a seasoned but enthusiastic engineering student at Virginia Tech.  She is driven by a passion for experiences and communication.

Alternative realities – art and architecture + Mirror Worlds

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is another in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Sean Jocher:

Today we started off by walking through the Art galleries on the first and second floors of Moss Arts Center. We were told to look at each painting without reading the description to try and understand what is happening without the context. When looking at the portrait of Monticello flooded, I could not grasp how they had real water in Monticello without damaging the place. After we were told that the Monticello in the painting was a model replica, I was shocked. The attention to detail that the artist put into the replica must have taken him tens of hours for a tiny house. This opened up my eyes that artists can put incredible amounts of effort into the paintings for them to see realistic and noteworthy. Most of the other paintings were the same way. Huge with immense attention to detail. I was definitely intrigued looking at all the works from the artists and how they relate to each other.

After the art exhibit, we learned about the mirror worlds project. This is one of the most fascinating projects at moss arts center to me because it directly relates to what I want to do in the future. We learned that the project uses fish eye lenses around the building to see where people are and portrays them as an avatar in the virtual world. The algorithm to get the location of each person from the camera was very interesting since it required more steps than I thought it would. Someone mentioned that using an infrared camera would be more efficient which I also thought would be a great idea. I was sad to hear that while the infrared camera was considered, the cost greatly outweighed the quantity of cameras they could use with a budget. I was amazed to learn that every aspect of mirror worlds has been carefully planned out and tested. The working product placed around MAC is amazing because it is very cool to see when myself show on the screens when I walk around. I asked what kind of hardware would be needed to run the mirror worlds program, and I happily learned that they are using some very powerful servers to do the job. I believe mirror worlds has great potential since it is the bleeding edge of technology.

Sean Jocher is a computer enthusiast! He loves learning about new technologies and how they can impact our lives.

 

Honors class joins the village

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is the third in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Heather Sangalang

Instead of our usual routine of visiting a specific location to experience the innovative creations that reside in the Moss Arts Center, we remained in the classroom to get educated about the serious matter of working with children. At first glance, the task of working with/around kids seems to be lighthearted and simple, but there turns out to be a lot of things that you must be aware of if. Our instructor went through a Powerpoint that contained important information about this subject.

The main goal of this “training” was to learn how to keep the children safe. They are entrusted in us and we should be made aware of how to protect them. When a child gets physically injured, we would either let another superior know or call for help ourselves; paperwork is also involved in this process. It may seem like a lot of extra steps when the easy solution would just be to help them ourselves, but for legal and safety purposes, others must get involved.

During the lecture, the class heard some disturbing and negative terms, such as pedophile. It is not a pleasant subject, but it had to be touched upon because, again, our number one goal is to keep the kids safe. We are not allowed to leave a child alone with an adult. I was uncomfortable learning about this at the beginning, but I had to realize that I had to know this if I was to work with kids because I would not want anything to happen to them under my watch, especially if it was preventable.

After getting through the Powerpoint of listed precautions and expectations, the members of the class split up to brainstorm possible emergencies that we could encounter and devise a solution for them. A few of the ideas that were shared included if a child had a seizure, if an earthquake hit, if a child got lost, and if the child had an asthma attack. We expressed our opinions on how to deal with those kinds of situations and our instructor chimed in with her advice as well.

After this class, the term, “It takes a village to raise a child”, made me realize even more that it does take a lot of people to raise kids. No matter whether we volunteer for K2C, the Science Museum, or any of the other activities that involves kids, we won’t be single-handedly responsible for the kids. We have each other, other parents, and other volunteers to assist us if there is an emergency. The most important things are to make the child happy and make sure they are protected and loved if something happens. I love working with kids, so this training excited me because I became more equipped for my K2C volunteering that starts next month. This class was beneficial for all of us because we will use this knowledge well-beyond this class.

I’m Heather and I love family, food, and football. You can usually catch me laughing, drinking coffee, or watching YouTube videos.

Adventures in virtual worlds: ICAT class visits the Perform Studio

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is the third in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Clark Cucinell:

The friendly robot stared at me for a moment, then offered me a floppy disk which had imprinted on it the image of a rocket. Using the controllers, I grabbed the floppy disk and inserted it into the printer on my left. As the rockets printed, I scanned the room. It was small, around the size of the interior of a typical RV. The space looked like the home of a graduate student preparing for their thesis presentation. Papers and cans were scattered everywhere, the desk in front of me was cluttered. Directly next tome were numerous screens and buttons, which I either could not interact with or did not know how to work. The rockets had finished printing, all four a stereotypical rocket shape with an orange body and light red cone top. I picked one up, pulled back the string dangling from the base, and let go. The rocket propelled itself through the air in random directions, leaving a trail of sparks as it flew around the room.

This is one of the many demos offered by the Oculus Rift, a Virtual Reality headset that immerses the user in a simulated, interactive environment. The headset hijacks the visual and auditory senses, while the controllers provide haptic feedback depending on which object you’re touching. The Performing Arts studio, part of the Institute for Creativity, Arts, and Technology (ICAT), in the Moss Arts Center provided this experience for the ICAT introductory class. We, the students, took turns using the two headsets available; one providing the experience of the previous example and the other introducing the combination of a Virtual Reality headset with Leap Motion, a sensor specializing in tracking hand movement.Using this hybrid headset, the user could manipulate furniture in the area around them by using hand gestures recognized by the LeapMotion sensor. Few of us had used this technology before, which quickly became apparent by the childlike enthusiasm in the room.

Virtual Reality technology is still in its infancy regarding everyday consumer participation. Only recently did these headsets reach price ranges of $600-800, and even then,there aren’t many applications for them yet. Furthermore, the headsets need to be adjusted in order to fit each user. Attempting to wear glasses with the headsets failed, and was very uncomfortable, so I wore it without my glasses.  Though not as prominent, I still experienced blurred vision similar to how I would see the world without glasses. This is apparently easy to fix but takes time, so fine-tuning the headsets for each person in a large group wouldn’t be practical.

Another major issue currently being resolved, in some very creative ways, is the dilemma of how to travel in the virtual world. It’s possible to physically walk and have the movement transfer to the virtual space, but this limits your traveling capabilities to the confinements of the room. The device used in the Perform Studio, and one I was allowed to experience, was the Virtuix Omni, a multidirectional movement simulation treadmill made specifically for virtual reality transportation. It looked like a tripod highchair with a concave base. I wore shoes with sensors on the top, used to track the movement, and plastic on the bottom that created a seemingly frictionless surface interaction with the base. A harness is used to ensure you don’t fall over,though it can be quite uncomfortable. After strapping in, the graduate students handed me the headset and controllers and gave me instructions on how to properly move on the treadmill. Before I knew it, I was running around in a room akin to a basketball court, but with slopes and walkways. I shot robots and defended a gigantic cube, which the robots would shoot, until my inevitable defeat.

Despite these obstacles, virtual reality technology has the potential to transform multiple aspects of society. Training for jobs, gaming and other entertainment experiences, and “visiting” out of reach locations are just some of the ways virtual reality can enhance our lives. Though the impact of this technology is limited until we manage to create consumer grade devices for most niches of society, we can still enjoy the demos and experiences that give us a taste of what is to come.

Clark Cucinell is a junior undergraduate researcher at Virginia Tech, where he is majoring in Computer Science and Chemistry. When he’s not studying or working, Clark can be found at Crimpers rock climbing gym or practicing guitar at his apartment.

ICAT class tackles transdisciplinarity

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is the second in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Pamela Kryschtal:

 

It’s easy to say that collaboration is important. But why it’s important is a more difficult question. Can disciplines truly and seamlessly coexist? What will the future of this continued collaboration look like?These, among other questions of interdisciplinary work, are the kinds of questions that interest graduate student Kari Zacharias, the guest speaker this past Monday in ourIntroduction to the Institute for Creativity, Art, and Technology (ICAT) class.

 

As students in this introductory class, we are beginning to expose ourselves to this notion of collaboration among different disciplines. To prepare for this day, we identified vocabulary words that would come in handy. In particular, understanding the difference between multidisciplinary, cross  disciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary. The difference between these concepts includes how they are implemented and how they are utilized to solve complex problems.

 

Our day with Kari was informative and interactive. Kari began with a general “get to know you” round table, an important step to get the creative juices flowing, particularly when the topic is collaboration. She then continued by giving us a history of the arts and sciences blending together. Everything from the catalyst of “9 Evenings” in the 1960s, to the 1980s where these artist-engineer hybrids began to name themselves, and back to the 1860s, where the foundation for this world began with land grant universities and the transition from solving university problems to real problems.

 

Kari followed this introduction with an exercise to gain an insight of the possible future of ICAT.She began by asking us what we considered to be challenges with ICAT.We came up with a relatively comprehensive list and included challenges such as improper balance among the disciplines, the inability to communicate, and the job concerns associated with spending too much time outside of your specialty. Kari asked us to pick two of these challenges that stood out to us. We as a class decided on the disciplinary divide in these settings, i.e. how important decisions get made, and the review process, since art is subjective and technology is objective. We placed each of these challenges on a coordinate plane with the disciplinary divide as the y-axis and the review process as the x-axis. Each end of the axes represented the extremes in each of these scenarios, a hierarchal vs. a radically democratic divide and a qualitative vs. a quantitative review process. We split in to groups and each tackled a quadrant of this graph and came up with a scenario for those imaginary settings. For example, what would the world look like if decisions were made in a hierarchy and all decisions were based on qualitative research? Aside from some discrepancies about when qualitative research is, each group came up with applicable and insightful scenarios that could assist in how we approach this world of collaboration.

 

As an engineering student who does not consider herself very creative, I found this entire day particularly interesting. Kari highlighted that this initial collaboration was intended to “save the soul of the engineer.” In her paper, “Land-Grant Hybrids: From Art and Technology toSEAD,” Kari and author Matthew Wisnioski point out that these types of collaborations at MIT began, “with the intention of “humanizing” MIT’s local and national image through civic art.”was beginning to think that I was studying to become a pencil pushing numbers monger in need of saving until I read that, “MIT provided the equipment and the experts to realize artists’ interpretations in technological media.” I was put at ease with the realization that while I might benefit from an artist’s perspective, the respect is mutual and we all need each other.

 

Pamela Kryschtal is a seasoned but enthusiastic engineering student at Virginia Tech. She is driven by a passion for experiences and communication.

Honors class visits the Cube

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is the first in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Adham Nabhan:

During our visit to The Cube, the class was able to experience firsthand the incredible technologies that the facility has to offer, both visually and acoustically. We began by delving into the splendor of Pink Floyd’s The Dark Side of the Moon using the 130+ speakers that The Cube has at its disposal. Because of the immersive natural of the space, one could listen to guitar riffs float from their right and clash over head as they meet hard drum lines coming from their left. Goose bump inducing.

We were also treated to an incredibly unique experience in which The Cube was able to recreate the sounds that would be heard if the class was on the field in Lane Stadium during a football game. The noise was loud, but not nearly as loud as the battle cry in my soul. A very intense experience to say the least.

After going into greater detail about the programs and platforms that are used to create the immersive acoustic environments that The Cube offers, including the software that allows the user to manipulate the sound in the room with ultimate control, the class was formally introduced to the Cyclorama. This massive ring-like “canvas” gives ICAT’s artists a platform to display their creations like nowhere else on campus. We were shown several examples of the Cyclorama’s capabilities, highlighted by an immersive 360-degree look at elephants performing typical elephant tasks, such as walking, breathing, and walking, in their native Ghana.

Finally, the thirst from both our eyes and ears were quenched together when the class was shown a 360-degree courtside view of a basketball game at Cassell Coliseum, complete with 360 acoustics. Once again, my Hokie blood ran ferociously through my veins. This time, however, not because of the display itself, but because of the incredible work and effort that the people at ICAT have done to create such a unique, creative, and technologically advanced space for the great minds at Virginia Tech to have at their disposal.

Adham Nabhan breathes passion into everything he does. Whether he’s working towards his mechanical engineering degree, running up and down intermural fields, or writing in the third person, his energy and enthusiasm is apparent in all his work.