Albemarle County High School visit to Cube

A few days ago, about 30 high school students interested in VR came to visit Virginia Tech.  They toured Doug Bowman’s 3D Interaction Lab in the Perform Studio, the DAAS studio, and the ARC Visionarium.  They were a great group – very enthusiastic about the opportunities here at Tech.  Here’s a photo album of their visit they were kind enough to share!

https://goo.gl/photos/sWEWGMmdNZzZgmsd6

Robot Fan Mail

A little while back, Phyllis was forwarded this letter from a pre-school class originally sent to CHCI Interim Director Andrea Kavenaugh.  It’s quite sweet.  See the original letter and Phyllis’ response below:

Phyllis’ response:

 

March 18, 2016

The Rosa Sharks Class
Blue Mountain School
470 Christiansburg Pike
Floyd, VA 24091

Dear Ms. Stefi and the Rosa Sharks Class,

My friend Dr. Andrea Kavanaugh gave me your wonderful letter and drawings of robots and asked if I could help answer your questions.  I really like the way you explored what you already knew about robots and then asked questions to find out more about them.  I think you must be very good thinkers.

  1. What do robots eat?

This is a great question.  Robots need energy to work just like you do.  They use energy from batteries, solar panels, or an electric cord plugged into the wall.  They also need instructions so that they know what to do and when to do it.  We call those instructions “code,” and code comes from humans who tell the robot what it can do.

  1. Where do most robots live?

Robots live in lots of places.  Some of them live in houses.  Some live at businesses.  Some even live in outer space.  There are some robots on Mars right now, but I don’t know of any on Jupiter.  Robots live wherever humans need them to do a job.  The robot on Mars took pictures and sent them back to Earth.  People can’t live on Mars, so it was a great way to learn about the planet.  Some people keep a robot in their house to do the vacuuming!   (That’s a job they just didn’t want to do.)  You might even have a robot in your toys.  If you have a toy that does something like move or make a sound when you push a button or squeeze it, you have a robot.  My kids have Zhu-Zhu pets and a toy backhoe that are robots.

  1. Do robots go on vacation? Do they like to play?

Robots can’t do anything that humans don’t teach them to do.  A robot could go on vacation or play, but it would only do that if a human told it to.  Most of the time, humans just want robots to do work.  When the robots are not working, they might rest in a closet or on a shelf.  If you know someone with a smartphone, you can ask the smartphone about robots and vacation.  Siri is kind of like a robot, and she might know a better answer than I do.  Everything that Siri says, though, is something that a human told her to say.

  1. Where do robots come from?

Robots are built by people.  Sometimes robots are built by other robots, but people have to tell the building robots what to do.

  1. Do you need tools like a hammer and nails or a wrench to build one?

Robots are things that move and follow instructions.  You can use hammers and wrenches to make the thing and its moving parts.  You can also use scissors and tape and cardboard.  The shape of a robot can be made out of anything.  A lot of robots have motors that help their parts move.  The instructions part of a robot is usually a small computer.  People use coding tools – usually a bigger computer – to put the instructions into the robot’s computer.

  1. Can you build a robot for us to play with?

I suppose I could, but I think it would be more fun if you built one yourself.  You’d have to decide what kind of job you wanted it to do and how it should look.  I like to use a Makey Makey to make a basic robot that makes sounds.  You can also use a program called Scratch For Kids to learn to code.  Another way to learn about robots is to take apart some old toys that work like robots.

I hope I have been able to answer your questions.  Thank you again for asking them.  I hope you will keep asking questions and learning more and more.  I am sending your class a viewfinder that shows some fun things we do at my work.

All the best,

Phyllis

K-12 Visiting the Cube

Editor’s Note – This post is from Phyllis Newbill, the Outreach and Engagement Coordinator here at ICAT.  Enjoy!

 

I had the pleasure of hosting school groups today from Mountain Vista Governor’s School and Hardin Reynolds Memorial School in Patrick County.  Thanks to Tanner and Zach, the students saw and heard demos of basketball games, elephants, anechoic chambers, cathedrals, dog skeletons, and fantasy landscapes.  The groups also visited the Experience and Create Studios to see 3D printers, the laser cutter, and a project involving lots of pencils that I haven’t quite figured out yet.  I know that graphite is conductive, though, so I think that’s a clue.

I was glad to see Mountain Vista again.  Their school has done a great job of sending projects and students to the Maker Conference each year in the spring.  Today’s group was of tenth graders, so I’m looking forward to seeing them again later this school year or in future years.

The Hardin Reynolds students happened to tour the Create Studio at the moment that Panagiotis, a CHCI grad student, was finishing a 3D print.  He showed them how the 3D printer works, and also gave them a full demo of his 3D printed olive oil factory parts.

My favorite part of the day was when the students got to see a 3D fantasy landscape in the Cube, and they reached out to see if they could touch the objects they were seeing.