Exploring making and tinkering with Honors students

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is another in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

This week we visited the 3D print lab, the Fusion Studio, and a couple of other of the amazing new spaces at Newman Library.  Students were asked, “What are your experiences with making and tinkering? What was new to you about what you saw at Newman Library? What conditions and mindsets do you think are necessary for making and tinkering?”  Two students’ contrasting responses make up this entry.

From guest blogger Emily Barritt:

Making and tinkering are simply names for actions that people have been doing for years. The idea of creating something from nothing is what is behind making, and the idea of iterations, not 100% knowing what the end design is an allowing the creative process flow through multiple developments is the true essence of tinkering. One cannot work on a making and tinkering project with a closed mind about the end goal. Instead, one needs to approach the project with open arms and be willing to let what comes of working and reworking the given problem guide the final product. As disappointing as it is for me to realize, I am not a good maker or tinkerer. As somewhat of a perfectionist, I have a hard time failing and learning as I work through the problem. This is something that I have been trying to work on and I am actively looking for outlets to “practice” my maker and tinkering skills. I am strongly considering working on a simple design project for the 3D printer as a way to explore my maker side.

I am almost embarrassed to admit that I did not know that any of the resources that we saw today were available at the library. This class was definitely an eye opener for me. I am excited to see what new things are created from the spaces that are being developed for students. The library is most definitely doing their part in helping VT students invent the future.

Emily Barritt is a scientist who plays music, and a musician who studies science on a quest to integrate her fields to work towards developing something bigger than herself. She is eager to explore the new technologies of the day and integrate creativity, arts, and technology to develop new innovations.

From guest blogger Pamela Kryschtal:

What are your experiences with making and tinkering? 

This past week was my favorite class so far.  I felt a real connection not just to my major, engineering, but to my engineering law minor as well.  I would heavily consider myself a maker and a tinker, I like to come up with things I can use by recycling old objects.

I made the following headboard out of 2x4s, 4-inch foam, and fabric:

I made the following duvet cover out of purchased fabric and an old top sheet:

And I also made the following DVD shelf for my boyfriend out of an old pallet:

What was new to you about what you saw at Newman Library?  

Having not entered Virginia Tech as a Freshman, I’ve always found the library rather intimidating.  I barely know how to print anything or even check out a book, let alone 3D print something.  So essentially, it’s easy to say that everything was new to me about what we saw in Newman Library.  I talk about this class a lot with my friends and I can’t wait to show them the spaces I’ve discovered and reserve time to play with 3D technology.

What conditions and mindsets do you think are necessary for making and tinkering?

As I mentioned above, this week’s class connected to my minor of engineering law.  I think the first condition that is necessary for making and tinkering is the feeling of safety that the maker’s intellectual property is protected.  If people don’t feel like they will be able to maintain control over their own ideas, they will be less likely to take chances and attempt to make.

The mindset that is necessary for making and tinkering is that of creativity and fearlessness.  The creativity approach is obvious, as the word “create” is the root of the word.  The fearlessness is important when taking chances and being open to the idea that it might not work and that’s ok, because it also might work and be amazing.

Pamela Kryschtal is a seasoned but enthusiastic engineering student at Virginia Tech.  She is driven by a passion for experiences and communication.

Alternative realities – art and architecture + Mirror Worlds

(This semester, I’m teaching an Honors course all about ICAT. We spend each class period in a different ICAT studio or on a different ICAT project. This is another in a series of guest blogs from my students.  Stay tuned for more.  Enjoy!  ~Phyllis)

From guest blogger Sean Jocher:

Today we started off by walking through the Art galleries on the first and second floors of Moss Arts Center. We were told to look at each painting without reading the description to try and understand what is happening without the context. When looking at the portrait of Monticello flooded, I could not grasp how they had real water in Monticello without damaging the place. After we were told that the Monticello in the painting was a model replica, I was shocked. The attention to detail that the artist put into the replica must have taken him tens of hours for a tiny house. This opened up my eyes that artists can put incredible amounts of effort into the paintings for them to see realistic and noteworthy. Most of the other paintings were the same way. Huge with immense attention to detail. I was definitely intrigued looking at all the works from the artists and how they relate to each other.

After the art exhibit, we learned about the mirror worlds project. This is one of the most fascinating projects at moss arts center to me because it directly relates to what I want to do in the future. We learned that the project uses fish eye lenses around the building to see where people are and portrays them as an avatar in the virtual world. The algorithm to get the location of each person from the camera was very interesting since it required more steps than I thought it would. Someone mentioned that using an infrared camera would be more efficient which I also thought would be a great idea. I was sad to hear that while the infrared camera was considered, the cost greatly outweighed the quantity of cameras they could use with a budget. I was amazed to learn that every aspect of mirror worlds has been carefully planned out and tested. The working product placed around MAC is amazing because it is very cool to see when myself show on the screens when I walk around. I asked what kind of hardware would be needed to run the mirror worlds program, and I happily learned that they are using some very powerful servers to do the job. I believe mirror worlds has great potential since it is the bleeding edge of technology.

Sean Jocher is a computer enthusiast! He loves learning about new technologies and how they can impact our lives.